Micron Art

Idaho is a state full of distinct offerings with a common thread – the power of nature. From renewable energy, to the robust, artisanal food scene, to its renowned natural wonders, this vibrant, historical state garners great civic pride and enjoyment amongst the people who live here.

 

An integral part of the community in Boise, Micron is committed to both the business and the splendor of Idaho, so it makes perfect sense that the Micron Family Health Center displays custom art created to honor both the vintage charm and the extraordinary beauty within. We chose to highlight a range of popular hiking trails, hidden waterfalls, scenic overlooks, majestic rivers, and other picturesque destinations.

A Closer Look

Anderson Ranch

Read More

Anderson Ranch is a well-known water-skiing recreation destination. With several lush campgrounds and boat launches, this reservoir is also popular among fishermen looking to catch kokanee (Sockeye’s freshwater cousin), trout, smallmouth bass, and yellow perch. The dam also provides hydroelectric power and irrigation water to local farms.

Arrow Rock

Read More

This beautiful reservoir and dam are located just thirty minutes north east of Boise. The 18 mile long narrow canyon has over 60 miles of shoreline. Travelers willing to brave the winding gravel road will enjoy canoeing, boating, fishing and windsurfing. The surrounding land is part of Boise’s nearest national forest and was created nearly 100 years ago.

Boise River

Read More

During the summer months, residents and visitors grab their rafts and tubes, and jump in at Barber Park to enjoy one the states most idyllic stretches of water. Perfect for nature lovers hoping to spot bald eagles and deer, this river is also popular with fishermen looking for trout or steelhead. The Boise River later joins Snake river at the Oregon border.

CJ Strike

Read More

Named after a former Idaho Power Company President, this reservoir and dam is one of the state’s most family-friendly fishing and camping locations. The varied fishing opportunities make it a popular destination for both boat and bank anglers year-round. The Bruneau Arm is also a popular winter ice fishing destination.

Eagle Island

Read More

A former penitentiary farm, this land was developed as a State Park in 1983. Bordered by the North and South channels of the Boise River, this popular summer destination covers 545 acres, with several grassy picnic areas, disc golf, a zip line, and hiking, biking, and horse trails. Water lovers can choose between the waterslide or the swimming beach.

Lake Cascade

Read More

One of the largest bodies of water in Idaho, Lake Cascade is an all-season destination for fisherman. The lake is wind-strewn most afternoons, which draws sailboats and windsurfers to its waters, and multiple campsites offer several seasonal opportunities for biking, hiking, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, and more.

Lucky Peak

Read More

This State Park offers three distinct locations to visitors, all just a short drive or bike ride from central Boise. Dog-friendly Discovery Park is perfect for fishing, canoeing, or a picnic. Sandy Point welcomes families with a swimming beach, volleyball courts, and grassy, shaded areas. And boaters looking for a day on the water head to Spring Shores Marina.

Payette Lake

Read More

At its deepest point, this picturesque glacial lake in McCall is nearly 400 feet deep. Locals and tourists visit to hike the pristine mountains and take in the spectacular natural scenery. Boating, swimming, and fishing are popular in the summer, and history buffs remember to be on the lookout for Sharlie, the lake’s “Loch Ness” monster, first spied in 1920.

Redfish Lake

Read More

Located in the Sawtooth Valley, Redfish Lake was named for the tens of thousands of Sockeye salmon that historically made the arduous annual trek back to their spawning grounds. One year, after dams made the trek nearly impossible by 1991, a single Sockeye made it back to Redfish Lake, and was dubbed “Lonesome Larry.”

Robie Creek

Read More

One of Lucky Peak Lake’s most scenic destinations, Robie Creek Park is one of Idaho’s natural gems. Located at the base of the Boise National Forest, this park draws families and water enthusiasts alike. It is known for its popular and quirky half-marathon, Race to Robie Creek®. First run in 1975, the annual April race is known for its legendary afterparty.

Salmon River

Read More

A five-hour drive northeast from Boise, “The River of No Return” is the longest river system contained within a single U.S. state. From white-knuckle adventures on rollercoaster rapids, to swimming in tranquil waters on white sand beaches, the Salmon River offers both a playground and a learning ground for water enthusiasts and nature lovers alike.

Shoshone Falls

Read More

Best viewed in the spring when water levels are at their highest, this tumbling waterfall on the Snake River rushes over a horseshoe-shaped cliff. It was formed some 14,000 years ago due to catastrophic flooding during the Pleistocene ice age. The Shoshone Falls’ 212-foot drop has earned it the nickname “Niagara of the West.”

Snake River

Read More

This natural wonder winds its way through three states before joining with the mighty Columbia River. It used to produce nearly half of all spring chinook salmon, but natural and man-made elements have caused dramatic declines in those populations. The Snake River Canyon is also the location of a famous failed jump by Evel Knievel in 1974.

Spring Shores

Read More

Sitting on the shore of Lucky Peak Lake, less than 20 miles southeast of Boise, Spring Shores is a haven for boaters. Everything you need for a day on the water is at the marina, including parking, fuel, and supplies. And if you don’t have your own boat, you can rent one while there. Don’t forget to bring your dog, as this is a Fido-friendly location.

Thousand Springs

Read More

This state park is actually a combination of several others that have been gathered under a single entity. Along with the traditional activities found in parks that celebrate and observe nature, Thousand Springs holds a rich, geologic history that warrants exploration. Known as a wildlife haven, the various springs and pools are clean, pure, and relaxing.