Midtown Art

The theme for our first New York City location is based on iconic Central Park monuments located in the heart of Midtown. This impressive park, set on 778 acres in one of the busiest cities in the world, has over 40 million visitors annually. And while it may seem massive to the casual onlooker who stands at one of the many entrances to the park, it’s always the little things found in this great landscape that create joy and memories.

 

We are delighted our Midtown location serves as a reminder that it is the small details that make a monumental difference in how you experience your health.

A Closer Look

Balto

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Standing majestically on a rock outcropping near the Tisch Children’s Zoo is the bronzed replica of Balto, the hero sled dog. In 1925, Balto was part of a sled team that rushed diphtheria antitoxin to victims of an outbreak. Balto’s team weathered blinding blizzards as they rushed life-saving medication to the citizens of Nome, Alaska more than 674 miles away.

Eagle & Prey

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Created and cast in Paris in 1850 and installed in Central Park in 1863, Eagles and Prey is the oldest known sculpture in any New York City Park. Cast in bronze by artist Christophe Fratin, the statue depicts two eagles attacking a ram. The work’s rich surface texture and anatomical detail are typical of Fratin’s style. The statue was a gift to the City by industrialist Gordon Webster Burnham.

The Falconer

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The statue depicts a young Elizabethan falconer holding aloft a bird of prey poised for release. The statue is perched on a natural rock surface south of the 72nd Street. The original sculpture, created by George Simonds, was created and shown at the Royal Academy exhibition of 1875. Simonds himself was an avid falconer and this replica was commissioned for Central Park in 1878.

The Hunter

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This sculpture was the first park statue commissioned by an American artist and was created in the 1850’s but not cast until after the Civil War. Sculptor John Quincy Adams Ward was considered the “dean of American sculptors” for using a unique style of realism which was a marked departure neoclassical style of his day. This life-sized sculpture was based scenes from an 1864 hunting trip to the Dakotas.

107th Infantry

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Sometime after the Armistice that ending World War I was reached, artist Karl Illava was commissioned by the 107th infantry to create a statue depicting seven doughboys marching forward into battle. The base sits upon a 25-foot wide stepped granite designed by architects Rogers and Haneman. 5,000 citizens attended the commemoration in recognition of the “war that would end all wars.”

7th Regiment

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The statue depicts a member of the New York National Guard 7th Regiment during the Civil War soldier leaning against his rifle while surveying the distant horizon. The regiment was known as the “Silk Stockings” due to the large number of New York City social elites who volunteered for service. The moment is dedicated to the Union soldiers who lost their lives during that tragic conflict.

Grand Army Plaza

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Grand Army Plaza is the gateway to Central Park. The plaza takes its name from The Army of the Potomac, created in 1861, just after the battle of Bull Run and whose members served with distinction as a fighting force throughout the Civil War. The Impressive bronze statue depicting Union General William Tecumseh Sherman was created by American artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens in 1903.

Bethesda Fountain

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Rising from Bethesda Terrace, and topped with the famous Angel of the Waters statue, the fountain commemorates the Croton water system which allowed fresh water to be brought to New York in 1842. The statue references the Gospel of John which describes an angle touching the Pool of Bethesda to give it healing powers. The lilly in the Angels left hand symbolizes the water’s purity.

Honey Bear

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The beloved statue “Honey Bear” welcomes each visitor to the Central Park Zoo since 1937. The dancing bear was a creation of noted Brooklyn animal sculptor, Frederick George Richard Roth, who at the time was the official park sculptor for Central Park. The original statue was part of a whimsical fountain that has water spraying from five small frogs at the honey bears feet.

Mother Goose

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Another creation from sculptor Frederick George Richard Roth, this playful depiction of Mother Goose has been a park favorite since 1938. The statue shows the magical witch sitting astride a magical goose, with her long cape blowing majestically into the imaginary New York wind. Other children classics like Humpty Dumpty, Little Jack Horner, Old King Cole, and Mary and her little lamb can also be found.

Dancing Goat

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Works Progress Administration sculptor Frederick George Richard Roth was commissioned in 1937 to design embellishments to the entrance of the newly opened Central Park Children’s Zoo. Originally designed as a water fountain and companion piece to Honey Bear, it flanks Kelly’s Cafeteria on the Zoo’s western. Children love the detail of the five ducks playing at the goat’s feet.

Maine Monument

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The beautiful Maine Monument commemorates the 260 American sailors who died on February 15th, 1898 when the USS Maine exploded in harbor in Havana, Cuba. Newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst called for a public memorial and the sculpture was dedicated in 1913.The sculpture was cast from metal recovered from the USS Maine.

Lehman Gates

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Designed by Paul Manship, the renowned sculptor of Prometheus at Rockefeller Center’s skating rink, these Art Deco inspired gates depict the interaction between children and animals – a fitting theme for the zoo’s entrance. The gates were donated by Governor and Mrs. Herbert H. Lehman, in honor of their 50th wedding anniversary and timed with the opening of the Children’s Zoo in 1961.

Delacorte Clock

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One of the most popular features of Central Park, is the Delacorte Clock that rings out with seasonal chimes and tunes from nursery rhymes. The clock features three tiers with unique animal sculptures on all levels, including two bronze monkeys circle the while pounding hammers against a large bronze bell. Today, the digital programming plays 32 nursery rhymes throughout the day.

Gapstow Bridge

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Located at 62nd street in Central Park, the Gapstow Bridge offers a breathtaking view of the New York City skyline. It is located at the northeast end of the Pond and was designed by Jacob Wrey Mould in 1874. The lovely but delicate original wooden bridge and cast iron railings eventually had to be replaced due to weather damage by the stone structure that stands at the site today.

Greyshot Arch

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When you see movies depicting scenes at Central Park, there’s a good chance you’ll see Greyshot Arch front and center. Constructed in 1860, this arch, located just inside Central Park west, is one of the busiest thoroughfares within the park. It was designed and built in grey sandstone, under the direction of architect Calvert Vaux, and its recognizable by its signature infinity loops with fleur-de-lis insets.