San Francisco Art

San Francisco’s architecture once blended into the natural hills and flatlands of the city. As time went on, and the advancements and influences of technology grew, so did the buildings. Now this prosperous urban destination offers an iconic skyline, with skyscrapers that stretch up and over the fog banks, allowing the people within to see beyond the present and into the future. San Franciscans optimistically embrace change and champion a holistic approach to work and life.

 

Crossover Health aligns with that desire for wellness, inclusivity, and fingertip access to a technologically-advanced path forward. We hope the vibrant colors, the playful designs, and the unusual combinations of our San Francisco Skyscape artwork help you find your own unique perspective on the journey to your best health and well being.

A Closer Look

101 California

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This timeless, Philip Johnson-designed building located at the corner of Market and California is a juxtaposition of shapes occupying an entire city block: a triangular base sits atop a square lot, and supports a soaring cylindrical tower. The upper windows offer expansive views of the Golden Gate and Bay bridges, Treasure Island, and Alcatraz.

181 Fremont

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Architect Jeffrey Heller’s love of sailing inspired these luxury condominiums. The expansive views mirror the limitless sightlines from the bow of a ship. Water’s graceful flow and the powerful force of wind were key influences in the building’s shape, style, and architectural detail. Each condo is as unique as the San Franciscans who live there.

345 California

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Flanked on each corner by historic buildings, 345 is a multi-use, 48-story skyscraper. The top 11 floors house a luxury hotel, split into twin towers connected by several glass skybridges, giving guests premier views of the city. In true San Francisco fashion, the building has its own wine store, fitness studio, and state-of-the-art energy controls.

555 California

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This 52-story, 1.8 million square foot building is a trophy tower in San Francisco’s iconic skyline. The skyscraper, with it’s thousands of bay windows, has been featured in several movies, is centrally located near some of San Francisco’s most famous restaurants and destinations, and is partially owned by the Trump Organization.

AT&T Park

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Home of the World Series Champion San Francisco Giants, AT&T Park has been dubbed “baseball’s perfect address.” Statues, playground slides, and water dogs fetching home run balls out of the bay all add to the whimsical environment. Vintage charm pairs with modern amenities to create a venue that’s uniquely San Francisco.

City Hall

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This National Historic Landmark District building took 27 years to build and 28 seconds to be destroyed, thanks to the 1906 earthquake. The structure has been repaired, restored, and reopened twice since then, and the massive signature dome with its gilt detailing has towered over both tragic and jubilant occasions for decades.

Coit Tower

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An eccentric, wealthy socialite named Lillie Hitchcock Coit willed a bequest to go towards beautification of the city she loved. In 1933, Coit Tower and the statues of three firefighters were built in her memory. President Roosevelt’s Public Works of Art Project funded a series of controversial fresco murals in the lobby of the tower.

Four Embarcadero

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The tallest building in a development of six interconnected skyscrapers, this commercial complex holds multiple offices, two hotels, two movie theaters, and an underground shopping center with over 100 shops, bars, and restaurants. In winter, the complex adds to the holiday spirit with the Bay Area’s largest outdoor ice skating rink.

Flood Building

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In 1902, James L. Flood hired architect Albert Pissis to build a structure in honor of his late father. Completed in 1904, its steel frame and brick walls withstood the devastation of the 1906 earthquake and fire. This iconic building – which cost just $1.5 million to erect – has been a center of business in San Francisco for over 100 years.

Market Center

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Located on over 700 feet of Market Street frontage, this pair of towers were built separately. The first building was finished in 1964 and tops out at 21 stories; the second tower was completed in 1975, and is almost twice as tall with 40 floors. With views of the bay, this complex is at the heart of San Francisco’s Business District.

Millenium Tower

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This 58-story condominium development is the tallest residential building in San Francisco. The tower’s highest level is listed as floor 60, because floors 13 and 44 are missing due to superstitious reasons. Recently a penthouse sold for nearly $15 million dollars; good timing as that same year, the public was notified that the building is sinking and tilting.

MOMA

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Originally opened in 1935, the museum’s 1995 redesign was inspired by the water and fog of the San Francisco Bay. The museum has since expanded again, and now offers special exhibitions, curated permanent collections, and works specially-commissioned for the museum. All in, it’s nearly 45,000 square feet of art-filled free public spaces.

One Market Plaza

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Perched on the waterfront, the three buildings in this complex have unobstructed views of the Embarcadero, Ferry Plaza, and both the Golden Gate and Bay bridges. The development is made up of the Southern Pacific Building (aka “The Landmark”), and Spear and Steuart Towers, which are bridged by a 6-story retail and office annex.

Phelan

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Built in 1881 by James Phelan, this triangular structure was advertised as “fire and earthquake proof.” Alas, the building was badly damaged in the 1906 post-earthquake fire and had to be demolished. Phelan’s son rebuilt in 1909, going from six to 11-stories, including a rooftop garden and penthouse, in which he famously entertained guests with lavish galas.

Port of San Francisco

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Once gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill in 1849, the Bay Area began welcoming tens of thousands of gold-seeking adventurers. The Port quickly became known worldwide as “one of the finest natural harbors in the world.” By 1908, the Port Authority had constructed 23 piers along the waterfront, which remain a vibrant shopping location today.

One Rincon Hill

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This tower was completed in 2008, and its location and size makes it one of the biggest additions to the San Francisco skyline in 30 years. The building has architectural and structural innovations to help protect it from seismic activity and strong winds. LED floodlights on the crown are the city’s first digital weather beacon.

Russ Building

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This majestic National Historic Landmark stands in the heart of the Financial District. Interior details have been painstakingly preserved and refurbished over time, and the vintage architecture contrasts with the modern office upgrades to create a new classic. This grand, neo-Gothic building is LEED Platinum and EPA Energy Star certified.

Salesforce Tower

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This modern, sleek building occupies a full city block and is the metro’s tallest structure. Its contemporary details are quintessential Bay area, and the column-free interiors allow collaboration and innovation to thrive. The novel outdoor air intakes on each floor literally bring a breath of fresh air inside, and a host of outside amenities are mere steps away.

Sentinel

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This classic Beaux-arts flatiron building, clad in white tile and copper, is one of the most distinctive in North Beach. Originally owned by notorious, jailed politician Abe Ruef, it’s now a Francis Ford Coppola property housing his offices, a screening room, a private top-floor apartment, and Zoetrope Restaurant, which features Coppola’s Napa Valley wines.

Transamerica Pyramid

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What was once an abomination to San Franciscans, this obelisk-shaped, post-modern building is now one of the city’s most recognizable icons. The hollow spire is 212 feet tall, and the two “wings” house an elevator, stairwell and smoke tower. A plaque honoring two famous dogs – “Bummer” and “Lazarus” – sits at the base of the building.